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Engage with customers or feed the Google beast?

Web sites are read by your customers. And so to attract new customers and keep existing ones it needs to look good and they need to find the information they need easily.


In many cases people relate strongly to pictures and we all know the adage that a picture is worth a thousand words. That quote is often attributed to Frederick R. Barnard, who published a piece commending the effectiveness of graphics in advertising with the title "One look is worth a thousand words", in 1921 but he took it from an ancient Chinese proverb that said “One picture is worth ten thousand words”.


So customers love pictures, but your web site is also read by computers and they largely ignore pictures, preferring text, and lots of it. Your ranking and SEO is very influenced by the content of your web site and useful it is perceived to be.


It reminds me of the days when we used to read broadsheet newspapers. Headlines and pictures above the fold, text and details below the fold.


So how do you satisfy both needs?


At our next meeting Kate Golby-Kennedy, a creative web designer, graphic designer and mentor for businesses from Tunbridge Wells, will give us her views about how to satisfy both people and computers and how that should influence the design and content of your website. She specialises in helping businesses look professional and sound authentic.


Come along and join us. If you would like to be my guest for breakfast at our next meeting at 7am on Thursday 3rd November, drop me a line with a few details of your business.


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